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Bhikkhu Ordination of Amarasiri & Sirimedho – Part 2: Going Forth & Request

On September 16, 2016 at Tisarana Buddhist Monastery, Venerable Amarasiri and Venerable Sirimedho took Bhikkhu Ordination (Upasampadā) under Luang Por Vīradhammo as Preceptor, and Ajahn Pavaro and Tan Khemako as Chanting Ācariyas.

(This is part 2 of 3. Event recorded at Tisarana on 16 September 2018. Duration 19:44)

If you have trouble viewing the video, or for more information, please go to https://files.tisarana.ca/amarasiri_sirimedho_ordination/.

A True Refuge

Awareness can be understood as an objective state of mind that simply knows things as they are. Ajahn Viradhammo stresses how to recognize, in our day to day life, that our experiences (of pleasure, pain, various moods) are constantly changing. But if we look deeper at the awareness behind it all, we can see that awareness is unchanging. It becomes a center grounding point, a true refuge.

(Talk recorded at Tisarana on 1 September 2018. Duration 28:43)

Bhikkhu Ordination of Amarasiri & Sirimedho – Part 1: Introduction & Parittas

On September 16, 2016 at Tisarana Buddhist Monastery, Venerable Amarasiri and Venerable Sirimedho took Bhikkhu Ordination (Upasampadā) under Luang Por Vīradhammo as Preceptor, and Ajahn Pavaro and Tan Khemako as Chanting Ācariyas.

(This is part 1 of 3. Event recorded at Tisarana on 16 September 2018. Duration 35:05)

If you have trouble viewing the video, or for more information, please go to https://files.tisarana.ca/amarasiri_sirimedho_ordination/.

All Salads Taste the Same

Ajahn Viradhammo answers questions from Tisarana’s resident community at tea time. He compares the need for jhana and the role of samma samadhi, the difference between ultimate reality and present moment awareness, how to train with distracting thoughts by using contact at the sense doors, and on how an attachment to things going well conditions the perception of things not going well.

(Q&A recorded at Tisarana on 2 August 2018. Duration 1:03:30)

Awakening the Mind with Metta

Ajahn Viradhammo has tea with the community and reflects the true quality of Theravada Buddhism: “Reflective as opposed to an absolute teaching”. Furthermore, he goes on to give another perspective of Metta which can sometimes be wrongly described as “emotional”. He describes instead Metta as a factor for enlightenment, a “fundamental component of the awakened mind”. There is the Metta which we practice thinking of our families, our friends, our community and wishing them well, wishing them happiness. This is done from the perspective of “you and I”. However, here, Ajahn Viradhammo describes Metta as a universal acceptance of things as they are: “It all belongs”.

(Q&A recorded at Tisarana on 28 May 2018. Duration 1:07:08)

Sound and Awareness

In this guided meditation, Ajahn Viradhammo invites us to open up to the sound around us. Notice how the sound changes, but the awareness behind the sound is unchanging. Then move attention to the body as a whole, sitting where you are; and finally resting on the breath.

(Guided meditation recorded at Tisarana on 1 September 2018. Duration 06:25)

Do Monks Cry?

During tea with Ajahn Amaro, someone asked if monks cry. This lead to a discussion, with Ajahn Amaro drawing from his own personal experiences. He reflects how monks, or even enlightened beings, can experience emotions such as sadness or irritation, but they are able to let it go and not cling to it as “I” am sad, or “my” emotions. He gives advice on how we can cultivate this attitude ourselves when faced with difficult emotions.

(Q&A recorded at Tisarana on 5 May 2018. Duration 1:21:38)

A Disfactory Clockwork

Tan Khemako explains in detail the measure of dukkha in our daily life. Starting by showing how the mind feels pain and where it can lead, he encourages us to explore the very feelings of dissatisfaction. Seeing their causes and learning how to release them will then pacify the mind. Thus, bright and wholesome states will have much more room to develop and prosper.

(Talk recorded at Tisarana on 11 August 2018. Duration 43:27)

The Five Niyamas

Ajahn Pavaro explores the topic of the five niyama or laws of Nature in the Buddha’s teaching and how they relate to our direct experience of reality. Understanding these principles, we can find ourselves in different situations: good or bad, pleasant or difficult, but trained with the proper attention, it is possible to orient our life to a more peaceful and pleasant abiding. This talk also includes a couple questions and answers at the end.

(Talk recorded at Tisarana on 18 August 2018. Duration 43:23)